Breast cancer risk from some menopause hormones may last decades

Breast cancer risk from some menopause hormones may last decades

December 17, 2019 0 By Emma Taylor

Long-term results from extensive federal studies suggest that women who use certain hormones after menopause increase their risk of breast cancer almost 20 years after stopping the drug. The risks are low, but doctors say new generations of postmenopausal women haven’t made the breakthrough discovery that combines high rates of breast cancer with hormonal drugs that combine estrogen and progesterone since 2002. “The information may not be clear,” says Dr. Rowan Kurebowski of the Harbor UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California. He discussed the new findings at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on Friday.

The results come from the Women’s Health Initiative, a federally funded study that tests long-established pills when doctors help prevent problems like heart disease, bone loss, and more. Over 16,000 women aged 50 to 70 have hormonal or counterfeit drugs for 5 to 6 years.”Most researches got discontinued in 2002.” At that time, researchers also discovered heart disease and breast cancer in hormone users. Women should stop treatment, but doctors continue to study it and have about two-thirds of the information. After 19 years of follow-up, women taking hormones developed 572 cases of breast cancer, while women on placebo developed 431 cases of breast cancer. This increases the risk of disease by 29% in people who take hormones.

Since there have only been 141 people in between for many years, women with severe redness and other symptoms of menopause sometimes find that the benefits of taking this drug outweigh the risks. It is recommended to use the minimum capacity as soon as possible. “Hormones stimulate cell growth,” says Dr. C. Kent Osborne, breast cancer specialist at Baylor Medical School. The formation and detection of a tumor can take several years. Taking estrogen alone increases the risk of developing uterine cancer, so it must be taken with female hormones. However, 1 in 4 women over the age of 50 can treat the symptoms of menopause by losing their uterus and taking estrogen alone.